Columbia Slot Reels Spinning Too Fast

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Columbia Slot Reels Spinning Too Fast

Postby superbird70 » Fri Oct 06, 2017 9:51 am

Hello,

I just acquired a Columbia slot that is functional but needs fine tuning. When the reels spin, they stop into position very quickly and almost simultaneously. Based on Youtube videos I've seen and my other slots, I believe the reels should spin for a longer time and stop gradually in progression. Is there any part I should be looking at that would help to lengthen the play cycle? I'm not too familiar with the details of the mechanism in a Columbia and appreciate any help.

Thanks!
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Re: Columbia Slot Reels Spinning Too Fast

Postby marsonion » Fri Oct 06, 2017 1:19 pm

superbird70 wrote:Hello,

I just acquired a Columbia slot that is functional but needs fine tuning. When the reels spin, they stop into position very quickly and almost simultaneously. Based on Youtube videos I've seen and my other slots, I believe the reels should spin for a longer time and stop gradually in progression. Is there any part I should be looking at that would help to lengthen the play cycle? I'm not too familiar with the details of the mechanism in a Columbia and appreciate any help.

Thanks!


If you view the mechanism from behind, look to the roots of the reel stops (directly below and a little to the right of the green "2" in the picture) and you'll find a small, curved plate clamped down by two screws; this item acts as a reel stop timing fork of sorts. It has three shallow notches of slightly different depths which release each stop in sequence as the main drive bar recedes. I've seen this plate bent or worn in various ways on machines which have gotten plenty of use, so you might find some deep grooves in it if you pull it out and inspect it. That might require replacement. I believe Bud Gott (search his name on this forum for contact info) has NOS replacements available for sale. On the other hand, a cycle that runs too fast as you describe can also result from a worn clock; the only way I've found to be sure is to replace it with a Columbia clock which is known to be in good working order, i.e. from a Columbia that's running well. I have worn clocks which I've removed from machines I've repaired over the years, which seem to work just fine in hand, but totally screw up the cycle in any machine into which they are mounted. I'm sure there are many malfunctioning Columbias out there which would be cured of all ills if only their rotten old clocks were replaced with fresh ones.
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